Categories
Photography

Weekly Photo Challenge: Near and Far

I’m playing with the near and far theme here, juxtaposing a near sun and a far sun in the photo. One sun is two or three centimeters away from my lens, the other about 93 million miles. I’ll let you guess which is which. Anyway, I took this photo right before sunset in my backyard, as I wanted to get the unfocused shadows of the grass for a soft background.

-Tim

Categories
Cal State Fullerton Photography

Weekly Photo Challenge: Urban

Students at the first day of school

For the urban weekly photo challenge, I choose to show students walking in the Quad at Cal State Fullerton on the first day of school on Monday. On the left is an information booth for lost students. A large campus that can take 10 minutes to walk from one place to another, it is a very urban area where people can easily drift into anonymity.

(The full-screen picture is clearer.)

Categories
Baseball Photography Travel

Cheering on the San Diego Padres

The Padres wearing their cool camo jerseys celebrating Coast Guard appreciation day

My family and I took a day trip to see the Padres game at Petco Park and visit Balboa Park yesterday. The Padres had an impressive day with homers by Chase Headly, Yonder Alonso and Carlos Quentin in a 7-3 victory over the New York Mets. (Here’s a game summary .) The best thing about Petco Park is the family-friendly park area in the outfield, complete with a grassy hill and baseball field for kids. The park seamlessly melts into the surrounding downtown area making it a beautiful sight and my favorite baseball stadium.

I like the park’s tan and navy blue colors
From left to right: My mom, my brother, me and my dad

Here’s the park area:

Got this collage of Mets pitcher Manny Acosta’s windup

We then went to Balboa Park after the game. Balboa Park is a huge park and cultural center with art exhibits, concerts and museums and is next to the San Diego Zoo. It is definitely a must-see for anyone traveling to San Diego and is a mile or two from downtown.

The botanical gardens and pond

We capped off the day with dinner in Old Town, one of my favorite places in the city. Yeah it’s touristy, but you can get amazing Mexican food and a feel for how California was in the nineteenth century. Exploring Old Town’s  Wikipedia page, I discovered:

  1. San Diego was settled in the 1770s by the Spanish and is the first European settlement in the West Coast,
  2. Father Junipero Serra started California’s first mission here, and
  3. When Calif. was admitted to the U.S. in 1850, San Diego had a population of only 650!

 

Categories
Photography

Nature

“And God said, ‘Let the land produce living creatures according to their kinds: livestock, creatures that move along the ground, and wild animals, each according to its kind’… And God saw that it was good.”
-Genesis 1:24

Dragonfly
Bee
Bee

“Go to the ant, O sluggard,
Consider her ways and be wise.”
-Proverbs 6:6

Categories
Photography

Leaves

Leaves in the late-afternoon sun at a park near my house. Love nature & trees! Have a nice day!

Categories
Art Culture Fullerton Photography

Downtown Fullerton street photography

After touring downtown Los Angeles a few weeks ago, I was curious to try out street photography. Street photography is a National Geographic-type candid photography of people  in public places like concerts and downtown areas.

I went to downtown Fullerton in Southern California on a hot late-afternoon (around Chapman and Harbor). It has a pretty vibrant night life but it was not that busy when I was there. Here is a few of my shots. I realized it’s a lot harder than it looks! You also need a fast camera to snap pictures quickly without people thinking your’e a stalker (one guy noticed he was on camera and waved).

I can’t figure out why the guy on the left has his face painted gray and red.
Riding a bike down Harbor Blvd

Also, walking around downtown I saw the memorial to Kelly Thomas, the homeless man who was allegedly killed by Fullerton police officers a year ago. Two of the Fullerton city councilmen were just recalled last month in response to the incident. The memorial is at the Fullerton Transportation Center. The sidewalk has chalk paintings and quotes that include, “Homelessness is not a crime.”

Kelly Thomas memorial with a bus in the background.

I do want to try out more street photography, it would be better in Los Angeles where there are a variety of different people. Any suggestions to take better street photography pictures?

Categories
Photography Travel

The sights and sounds of Downtown Los Angeles (Photos)

There is something about downtown areas. It may be the architecture or the bustling atmosphere of anonymity, but cities just provide a great place to watch the world.

It is the variety of people I watch wandering around, and the worldly accomplishments we display to millions of people through our buildings- higher and higher, cooler and cooler.

Anyway -moving away from Philosophy 101- I took a mini vacation to Los Angeles yesterday.

I hopped on the Metrolink to go to Los Angeles Union Station from the Fullerton train station. It was a Monday with June gloom cloud cover in the morning and sunny, 80s temperature in the afternoon. Luckily I wore a hat because it got hot!

Catching my train to LA

Even though I live 30 miles south of Los Angeles, I hardly ever make it out to the city. This was only my second time journeying through downtown.

L.A. Union Station, with its old-time, regal 1930s feel, it absolutely amazing. I walked over to Olvera Street, a historic Mexican cultural district. It was empty at 9:30 a.m. but was busy, with mariachi music playing, when I came back in the afternoon. Next, I made my way towards the impressive City Hall building.

There is a public park just south of City Hall filled with homeless people and their blue tarps. I saw one man sitting on a bench, his 20 CVS plastic bags hovering at his feet.

City Hall

Since it was about 10 a.m. and still cloudy, I used the coolness to walk uphill (Downtwon L.A. is pretty hilly and all the main skyscrapers are on the crest of the hill). I visited the fantastic 10-year-old Catholic Cathedral of Our Lady of the Angels, a modern architectural wonder that includes no right angles, giving it an aura of mystery and majesty, according to its website.

As I walked inside, I instinctively knew to take off my hat in such a hollowed place. The open sanctuary has a brown theme, with dark brown polished pews and walls of tan alabaster or marble, along with carvings of Jesus and the saints.

I don’t have to be Catholic to enjoy this awe-inspiring cathedral (I’m a non-denominational Christian). It is great that this large proclamation of God and Jesus is so prominent in the city.

Next, I made my way two blocks west to the Walt Disney Concert Hall, my favorite sight in Downtown LA. Interestingly, the Disney Hall and the LA Cathedral are both about ten years old and are both highly-esteemed architectural wonders that have transformed downtown into a more vibrant community.

The smooth, flowing silver is quite a sight, especially on a sunny late-morning day. It also has a cool courtyard on the second floor.

Me in front of the concert hall

Continuing southwest on Grand Ave, I made my way to the California Plaza with the Bank of America and U.S. Bank skyscrapers nearby. The large courtyard has a pool and a great view south.

Angels Knoll, right next to the plaza, is a great place to relax. I should have taken the Angels Flight! The knoll is a cool, green park and a great escape from the rest of the city.

Panorma looking southwest

I then strolled over to the Los Angeles Central Public Library, an amazing six-story building with a rotunda! I love the iconography: the rotunda has statues of Plato, Dantes, David and St. John, stained-glass pictures of a sun and is topped with a hand holding a torch.

Probably my favorite library

I then walked south to Pershing Square, which offers a great 360-degree views of the city’s skyline, and then met my friend Andy for lunch at a Pastrami shop next to where he works at the bustling 6th and Olive.

Pershing Square, in the heart of downtown, is a nice place to relax

I then headed south toward Broadway’s Skid Row, a poor area of town. All along Broadway are shops selling random stuff like shirts, CDs, old electronics, many of which with signs exclusively in Spanish. I even saw a few “Compromos Oro” (“We buy gold”) shops. Iwanted to check out The Last Bookstore, but I honestly didn’t see much there that I liked.

I then headed back to Union Station and back home at 3 p.m., exhausted at walking probably around 4 miles in Southern California’s summer weather. I am surprised how many police cars I saw throughout the city. Most were just cruising or parked on the side of the road, but police offers were everywhere just walking around.  There were a few trying to get a man not wearing a shirt to get off a closed portion of Pershing Square that was going to be repainted, but he kept yelling stuff like,

“What a waste of [expletive] city resources!”

Overall, I had a great day trekking across Los Angeles. I managed touring the city well for only having been there once and never having taken the Metrolink.  Although, there’s only so much of LA I can handle at a time so I probably won’t be back soon- expect my next adventure to be somewhere more relaxing like the beach.

The Broad Museum, right, undergoes construction on a sunny mid-morning in Los Angeles. The art museum plans to open in 2013.

The sights: Skyscrapers, museums, a cathedral, a library, a park, public architecture, cars, busses, homeless people, businessmen and women, people taking pictures, food trucks, police cars, constructionsights, news vans, thrift shops.

The sounds: Police car sirens, shouting, cars, busses, mariachi music, construction drills, people walking, people talking, quietness at Angels Knoll park, kids yelling and playing on a tour.

Photos and text by Tim Worden

P.S. The last time I visited LA, it was to visit Hollywood and see a live taping of a TV show. Read it here.

Interesting sculpture on the AT&T building around Olive and 5th streets.
Categories
News Photography Politics

A day working at the California Primary Election (Photo essay)

I worked 15 hours as a poll worker clerk in the California primary election Tuesday, helping voters cast their votes.

This is our polling location, a newly-remodeled house nestled in the hills of east Yorba Linda. It is a small precinct, only having 825 voters in a dozen streets.

We had a great view:

Beautiful Yorba Linda in mid-morning as the clouds started to clear up for the day.

As it was the primary election, there was an expected poor turnout. Many voters in Yorba Linda seem to vote by mail (335 out of 825 people, or 40 percent). That leaves 490 potential voters that could have voted from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.

We had 108 voters. That means 22 percent of voters showed up at the polls. (See METHODOLOGY for more info).

So we had 100+ voters in 13 hours. That is a lot of free time. Luckily, I brought Insurgent by Veronica Roth, The Avengers (Ultimate Comics Avengers vs. New Ultimates) and Captain America (Marvel Masterworks: Captain America, Volume 6) to read!

This is the JBC (Judges Booth Controller), a computer that gives voters a code to vote and stores their votes. The clerk puts in the voter’s party and the voter is given his preferred ballot at any of the eSlate voting machines.

JBC computer.

These are the eSlate voting machines (they look like touch screens, but they use a track-ball iPod-like thing instead).

The eSlates.

The family who hosted us took care of us with sandwiches for lunch, a fully-stocked fridge of sodas and lasagna and bread sticks for dinner.

My brother Daniel, who also served as a clerk, eating his dinner.

This is my fourth time working at an election, and being a poll worker is always an exhausting but rewarding experience. I get to experience Democracy first-hand. It is great that in America, anyone can contribute to our government. I love seeing voters proudly flaunt their “I Voted” stickers.

One guy, probably in his late 40s, who zoomed to the polls in his yellow motorized bike, said he has voted in every election since he was 18 and eligible to vote.

“I wouldn’t miss it, it’s one of the perks of being an American.”

Poll workers received a primary pin (right).

 

-Photos and text by Tim Worden

METHODOLOGY: This is not scientific, it is my best estimate. There are some technicalities (a few voters who were Vote by Mail came and voted, so that would have some affect). I went through the list and counted the 335 Vote By Mail voters so naturally I made an error or two. So I will arbitrarily say, with the power vested in me (aka all the power in the universe), that my conclusions are true to within plus or minus 3 percentage points.