Categories
Photography

Spring 2017

Due to working full time at a library and beginning my master’s program, I had little free for my hobby of photography this spring. I am taking an online master’s Library and Information Science program at San Jose State University, which meant tons of reading, research and late nights this semester.

I still tried to take some pictures, however. Here are a few pictures from January – May 2017.

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Disneyland, April 2017
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Disneyland, April 2017
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Santiago Oaks Regional Park, March 2017
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Santiago Oaks Regional Park, March 2017
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Santiago Oaks Regional Park, March 2017
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Panorama of Santiago Oaks Reginal Park, March 2017
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Testing the new Panasonic GH5 camera, April 2017
Disposable Camera
Rowland Heights, April 2017. Taken with a Fujifilm disposable camera
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Bikers on the Santa Ana River Trail, March 2017
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Santa Ana, March 2017
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Mihaylo Hall at Cal State Fullerton, February 2017. Taken with a Fujifilm disposable camera.
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Anaheim, March 2017
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Anaheim Regional Intermodal Transportation Center, January 2017
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The 91 Freeway in Anaheim, January 2017
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Old Towne Orange, April 2017
Categories
Blog Photography

Dusk at Cal State Fullerton

With spring – and more daylight hours – coming, I decided to go out and take some pictures after work last week to get back in the photography groove.

Photos in this photo set taken with a Panasonic GH4 camera with a Panasonic 14mm 2.5 lens and a Nikon 50mm 1.8 lens.

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By Tim Worden. Copyright 2016, all rights reserved.

Categories
Photography

Photo Essay: Southern California Fall Colors

After a heat wave stretching well into October, Southern California managed to cool down for a bit in November, even as the sun has increasingly awarded warm golden hues at sunset and twilight.

Following experiments in warm and cold color variance last year, I ventured out to places around Orange County this fall to photograph not just the sunset, but the sun’s reflections on monuments and landscapes to capture fall’s range of warm, and cool, hues.

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Santa Monica, November 2015.
Yorba Linda in November 2015.
Yorba Linda, November 2015.
Cal State Fullerton, November 2015
Cal State Fullerton, November 2015

Photographs taken by Tim Worden in November 2015, except Brea sunset, taken in September 2015. Equipment used: Panasonic GH4 camera with Panasonic, Olympus and Nikon lenses.

Copyright 2015, all rights reserved.

Categories
Blog Fullerton

Fullerton Fox Theatre to celebrate 90th birthday with Roaring Twenties flair

The theater's sign has been repainted and re-installed. Photographed on May 4, 2015.
The theater’s sign has been repainted and re-installed. Photographed on May 4, 2015.

FULLERTON – After years of vacancy and neglect, the 1920s-era Fullerton Fox Theatre finally revealed visions of its former grandeur this month, as its iconic rooftop sign was re-installed, the capstone of a decade-long renovation project.

The sign, which had been grounded for the past few years, has been repainted a regal red, hearkening to the theater’s roots as a vaudeville house in the Roaring Twenties.

The work is in preparation for the theater’s 90th birthday celebration to be held later this month, a Memorial Day weekend ’20s-themed Speakeasy Days celebration.

The celebration will begin on Friday, May 22, with a sign unveiling and relighting ceremony. A community fair featuring tours of the theater and musical entertainment will follow on Saturday, May 23.

The theater’s resurrection is a thing some Fullerton residents have been waiting a quarter-century for, ever since the theater was shuttered in 1987.

The Fullerton Historic Theatre Foundation has been fundraising restoration efforts for much of the past decade, spearheading construction work on the theater’s interior, arch, walls and balconies for the past several years, according to the Orange County Register.

“We are trying to be as truthful to the original as possible,” Jeff Greene, president of EverGreene, the architectural firm that has been working with the foundation to renovate the theater, told the Register in February 2015. “The theater will look like it did the day it opened.”

But not all of the theater’s aesthetic will that of 1920s Hollywood glitz: Chandelier lights, as well as the rooftop sign, have been outfitted with Bivar LED lights, according to the theater.

By Tim Worden. Published on May 8, 2015.

Categories
Fullerton

Gathering held to mark third anniversary of Kelly Thomas’ death

Ron Thomas speaks on Saturday, Jul 5, 2014.
Ron Thomas speaks on Saturday, Jul 5, 2014.

FULLERTON – Ron Thomas, father of mentally-ill transient Kelly Thomas, said at a memorial gathering Saturday, July 5, that he has seen some positive strides made in the past three years since his son died following a confrontation by three then-Fullerton police officers in July 2011.

The fallout of that confrontation led to the resignation and recall of several Fullerton government and police officials and has sparked a national debate on the intersection of homelessness, mental health and police brutality.

The Orange County District Attorney’s office charged two of the former officers, Manuel Ramos and Jay Cincinelli, as responsible for Thomas’ death, but they were found not guilty on all counts by a jury in January 2014.

The counts ranged from excessive force to involuntary manslaughter and 2nd degree murder.

Ron Thomas said Saturday that despite the trial’s outcome, he was glad that he was able to get the charges against the officers filed, which he called an Orange County milestone.

“What I really want to see, what we really need to see — all of us around the world — is for at least one juror to come up and explain why they voted the way they voted,” he said.

The elder Thomas’ civil suit against the city of Fullerton is expected to start in December 2014, and there is the possibility of a federal lawsuit against the former officers, according to Thomas and media reports.

About 75 people attended the gathering, which was held at the Fullerton Transportation Center to mark three years since Kelly Thomas’ death.

Photo and report by Tim Worden. 

Published July 4, 2014 at 2 p.m.

Updated July 6, 2014 at 2:30 p.m.

Categories
Cal State Fullerton Fullerton

Opinion: ‘Student success’ fee compromise shows CSUF willing to consider student opinions

A screenshot of CSUF's Student Success initiative website.
A screenshot of CSUF’s Student Success Initiative website.
  • CSUF handles fee backlash well, rightly wishes to improve its tech and classrooms

The California State University has hit some hard times in the past few years, and various “student success” fees are only the most recent band aids proposed to fix a gaping hole of inadequate funds.

But after several years of frustrating (2009 tuition hikes) and confusing (Prop 30) actions, the CSU and its universities have apparently wisened up to the fact that student input should be more prominent in a tuition debate that shows no signs of being resolved anytime soon.

Cal State Fullerton – to use my alma mater as an example – spent more than a month aggressively seeking student input over its proposed “Student Success Initiative” fee, first proposed as costing students $240 each per semester to improve the university’s technology and athletics infrastructure.

The university held several open forums (which at first attracted low attendances), but the fee was eventually able to enter the student discussion due to a flashy informational website created by the university; an aggressive social media campaign; student opposition through protests and signature-gathering; and coverage by the Daily Titan, the university’s student-run newspaper, and other media.

Still, this coverage may not have helped much: The Daily Titan reported that the Student Fee Advisory Committee’s survey for students to give their feedback only received a response by about 10 percent of the student population.

Yesterday, the Student Fee Advisory Committee voted to cut the fee from $240 to $181 per student, and that the fee will be phased out over the next three years, according to the Daily Titan.

Not only does the committee deserves commendation for listening to student response, but the university should be thanked as well for aggressively trying to attract clearly uninterested and uninformed students, even adding more community forums to spread the message.

The fact is that technology does need to be vastly improved. CSUF is doing fine tech-wise now with several top-of-the-line classrooms and program offerings, but to keep that up, money needs to be maintained – money that is hardly coming from the state, as a Los Angeles Times editorial notes.

This whole situation shows me that the university is looking out for student interests in two ways:

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Mihaylo Hall at CSUF, one of the university’s premium offerings, which has improved the university’s image in recent years.

1. That the university desires to upgrade and maintain its technology, classroom and athletics infrastructure.

2. That the university is taking students’ opinions into consideration.

Both of these are a step in the right direction, so for the sake of the next generation of college students and the impact they will have locally and throughout the state, I say we continue this improvement.

Categories
Journalism

Kelly Thomas supporters gather in Fullerton to protest jury’s ‘not guilty’ verdict

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Kelly Thomas supporters sign a memory support book soon after hearing the jury’s verdict that two former Fullerton police officers were not guilty in the homeless man’s 2011 death.


By Tim Worden. Published Jan. 13, 2014 at 4:15 p.m. Updated Jan. 14, 2014 at 8 a.m.

In an emotional show of support, Ron Thomas, father of Kelly Thomas, spoke to a crowd of more than 100 supporters Monday night saying that he will bring justice to Kelly, a homeless man who was killed in a 2011 police confrontation that has rippled through the city of Fullerton for two and a half years.

While speaking to the crowd, Ron Thomas, wearing a pin that read, “I am the voice for Kelly Thomas,” said he will pursue other means of bringing justice to his son, such as seeking to change the California peace officers’ bill of rights.

“I want to change things,” Thomas said.

The gathering was sparked by a jury’s verdict Thursday afternoon that former Fullerton police officers Manuel Ramos and Jay Cincinelli are not guilty on all counts in the 2011 death of homeless man Kelly Thomas.

The counts ranged from excessive force  to involuntary manslaughter and 2nd degree murder.

Supporters, who began trickling in to the makeshift Kelly Thomas memorial shortly after the verdict was reached on Monday afternoon, quickly set up a podium with a Kelly Thomas guestbook for people to write down their support.

One supporter carved “Kelly” into the sidewalk with wax from a candle.

Members of the media record a supporter talking.
Members of the media record a supporter talking.

Orange County District Attorney Tony Rackauckas, Orange County’s highest attorney, personally served as the prosecutor alleging that Ramos and Cincinelli acted beyond their authority in the encounter.

“(The case) is not an indictment of the Fullerton Police Department or the police in general,” Rackacuckas said in his closing arguments rebuttal. “This is about a defendant, namely Ramos, who acted as a police officer but abused his authority,” Rackauckas said. “And it’s about another police officer who … unnecessarily increased that level of force … and that played a substantial part in the death of Kelly Thomas.”

Defense attorney John Barnett at the conclusion of the arguments phase of the trial said that the two officers acted by the book and according to their training in their encounter with Thomas.

“They did as they were taught, they did as they were told,” Barnett said.

Ron Thomas, father of Kelly Thomas, speaks to the media in downtown Fullerton on Monday night.
Ron Thomas, father of Kelly Thomas, speaks to the media in downtown Fullerton on Monday night.
Categories
Journalism

DA Rackauckas urges jury to use common sense to find officers guilty in death of Kelly Thomas

Defense Attorney John Barnett tells reporters that former officers Ramos and Cincinelli acted by the book and according to their training at a news conference outside the Orange County Superior Courthouse on Thursday morning.
Defense Attorney John Barnett tells reporters that former officers Ramos and Cincinelli acted by the book and according to their training at a news conference outside the Orange County Superior Courthouse on Thursday morning.
  • Jury began deliberations Thursday to decide fate of two former Fullerton police officers charged with the murder of Kelly Thomas

SANTA ANA – Orange County District Attorney Tony Rackauckas on Thursday implored the jury to use their common sense to come to a conclusion that Fullerton Police officers Manuel Ramos and Jay Cincinelli used excessive and unlawful force in a 2011 encounter with homeless man Kelly Thomas that the prosecutor argued ultimately caused his death.

In the final statements the jury will hear by the defense and prosecution, Rackauckas, Orange County’s highest attorney, systematically attempted to discredit the defense’s claims.

This culminated with Rackauckas playing the portion of the security tape that captured the confrontation that includes Kelly Thomas repeatedly yelling “Daddy” as he was being beaten by several police officers.

“(The case) is not an indictment of the Fullerton Police Department or the police in general … This is about a defendant, namely Ramos, who acted as a police officer but abused his authority,” Rackauckas said. “And it’s about another police officer who … unnecessarily increased that level of force … and that played a substantial part in the death of Kelly Thomas.”

Rackauckas said this trial is special in that it features video and audio evidence that show the confrontation, and urged the jury to watch the tape.

According to Rackauckas, Ramos and Cincinelli attempted to downplay their involvement and actions in the confrontation. But, for example, the tape shows Cincinelli repeatedly beating Thomas and afterward saying he “beat him probably 20 times in the face with this Taser,” Rackauckas argued.

The jury was dismissed to deliberate late this morning and is expected to deliberate at least through the day.

Defense attorney John Barnett, who is representing Ramos and Cicinelli, told reporters at a news conference following the rebuttal that the police officers were acting by the book during the confrontation.

“They did as they were taught, they did as they were told,” Barnett said.

Barnett said the case has already “devastated all law enforcement” since police officers need to look over their shoulders and fear the courts.

The Kelly Thomas memorial in downtown Fullerton, the site of the July 2011 confrontation, was decorated with a sign saying "Hope" when the trial began in December 2012.
The Kelly Thomas memorial in downtown Fullerton, the site of the July 2011 confrontation, was decorated with a sign saying “Hope” when the trial began in December 2012.

Rackackas said he wanted the jury to consider all the evidence as a whole and not to tip their hats on one specific item.

“It’s up to you to determine if the police used excessive or legal force,” Rackauckas said. “It’s up to you to determine the credibility of those witnesses.”

Rackackas’ final rebuttal finished the arguments stage of a five-week trial that, two and a half years after the incident, has highlighted issues of mental illness, police tactics and police brutality.

Kelly Thomas died in hospital care in July 2011 five days after the confrontation.

Ramos has been charged with second degree murder and involuntary manslaughter and Cincinelli has been charged with involuntary manslaughter and use of excessive force.

Story and photo by Tim Worden, Jan. 9, 2014  at 12:30 p.m. Last updated on Jan. 10, 2014 at noon.

Categories
Fullerton Photography

Eight-car crash in Fullerton leaves one dead, five injured

Fullerton Crash

“It sounded like a bomb,” witness Todd Degalo, a realtor at Century 21 Discovery, said of hearing the sound of an eight-car crash police say was caused by a man driving a yellow truck who was speeding and driving on the wrong side of the street.
The driver of that truck was killed in the collision and five people were injured, according to Fullerton police Sgt. Jeff Stuart.
Full story: http://www.fullertonstories.com/news/fatal-crash-on-harbor-at-valencia-mesa


Story and photos by Tim Worden, for FullertonStories.com.

Categories
Photography

Homeless advocates in Fullerton stage campout

Stephan Baxter, organizer of the event, holds up a sign.
Stephan Baxter, organizer of the event, holds up a sign.


Advocates for Fullerton’s homeless staged a Camp In on Sept. 17 in opposition to the city’s no camping ordinance, which does not allow people to sleep or live in public parts of the city like sidewalks and parks. See the story at FullertonStories.com.